Monday, 19 December 2016

Catching up with winter thrushes

I wasn't expecting to add two new species to my UK list within a week of returning from Cyprus, but that's exactly what has happened, with dusky thrush at Beeley in Derbyshire and black-throated thrush at St Asaph in Denbighshire.

Talk about luck, I thought I'd missed the Dusky thrush in Derbyshire, it was found, identified, twitched, accepted by BBRC and gone in the two weeks I was in Cyprus. Then it was miraculously refound on Saturday and suddenly I was back in the running. Still more good luck on Sunday, we arrived on site at 9.15, the bird showed at 9.30, disappeared at 9.50 and not seen again until late afternoon by which time we were long gone. Some said it was distant, perhaps so compared to the views in the orchard where it had shown particularly well in the early part of its stay, but it was still a decent view through the scope for 20 minutes or so, and it was certainly better than no view at all.

At St Asaph the black-throated thrush appeared from nowhere and landed in a tree right in front of us, showed well for a couple of minutes before dropping onto the ground and to feed in a stubble field near the New Inn.

UK Life: 419; Year 258 (Dusky thrush, black-throated thrush)


Dusky thrush.


Dusky thrush.


Dusky thrush.


Black-throated thrush. 1st winter female.


Black-throated thrush.


Black-throated thrush.


Black-throated thrush.


Redwing


Fieldfare


There were about 50 waxwings at St Apsaph which were much more photogenic.

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